Easy Chrysanthemum Cuttings


| 3/14/2018 11:13:00 AM


Chrysanthemums!  Some people love them, and some people hate them! Chrysanthemum plants are grown from cuttings. I really don’t know the specifics of this, but apparently, the best flowers come from plants with fresh root stock.

While you can order cuttings online, I find that it's best to take cuttings from the plants from last year's garden. Often you'll see new growth coming from the base of these plants when the weather begins to warm in the spring. The plants we'll take the cutting from is known as the "stool". Here in my zone 7 garden, the stools usually begin to produce new growth towards the end of February. If last year's mums didn't overwinter, cuttings from new plants will work wonderfully, too.

Chrysanthemum cuttings

A quick search for taking cuttings online will reveal gardeners propagating plants using grow lights and heating mats. For the novice gardener (and me) this might seem a little intimidating. The good news, however, is that there is a much simpler way! In a sense, winter sowing containers are nothing more than mini-propagators, acting to provide the best conditions for seed germination. With this thought, I had one of those awesome eureka-light bulb-type moments! I would put my cuttings into winter sowing containers, and root the cuttings outside! Even though the weather had still not turned and I was far from being frost-free, this was a HUGE SUCCESS. 38/38 cuttings. 100% SUCCESS.

Here’s how I did it:



End of February – I notice new growth on the chrysanthemum stools (last year’s chrysanthemum plant after being cut back). I dig them up and place them into winter sowing containers to encourage new and more rapid growth.